Lima, the Colorless City

For those who are not familiar with the city of Lima, it is kind of a South American London. The sky is always dull, grey, sad. The only difference lies in the fact that in London it rains much stronger. It is not Lima´s fault being grey and boring though. It was never predetermined to be, but most importantly stay grey. Lima is as it is because we have chosen to let it be colorless. What’s up with the obsession with white? Why are most buildings in Lima made in exposed concrete or painted white? We seem to live in a lie, in which we decide based upon everything but context.

Continue reading “Lima, the Colorless City”

A Door-less House

My Father was a lawyer. Nevertheless, he communicated me, his architect son, every small but interesting thoughts on space. I, however, never paid real attention to said ideas; Not to explore them, at least. I remember once he told me about a door-less house he had imagined: “I have always thought about a door-less house; One where you could find privacy without closing a door and find family without opening one”. Impossible, I thought right away. “How could I go to the Bathroom?”, was the first naïve question that eliminated the possibility of such a home from my mind. I was a first-year student, and I couldn’t be thinking about such nonsense.

Continue reading “A Door-less House”

Swiss Army Batch

Is there a way to satisfy different needs with a single architectural approach?

Some time ago I had the opportunity to present an entry for a 5-home design contest. The task consisted in designing the group of single-family houses, according to specific necessities and users. A common approach would be to plan each project separately. Another, thinking about each house as a unique element of a whole that has aesthetic language as a connecting theme. These lead to the question: Is there a step further? Is there a way to satisfy different needs with a single architectural approach? The formal solution to the problem was the creation of a basic module that contained all “rigid” program of a house: kitchen, bathroom, stairs. The result was a rigid, but compact package; Something like an architectonic swiss army knife.

Continue reading “Swiss Army Batch”